Here are all the articles I wrote during July, 2017. I hope they're useful to you.

July 17th, 2017

Pack your bags – we’re goin’ on a trip around the world!

The Insurance Mom mentioned in last week’s post that there seems to be a huge misunderstanding of how America’s health care delivery system compares to those of other countries.   The divine Michael Lujan, shares his expertise:

The UK Model – In this mostly single-payer model, healthcare is provided and financed by the government through taxes. Except for small co-pays for prescriptions, there are no co-pays or deductibles as health care is delivered as a public service, like fire and police. With Britain’s National Health Service, most doctors and hospitals are owned by the government and patient wait times can vary by region or treatment type. As the sole payer, the government controls what doctors can do, and what they can charge. Our Veterans (VA) system is a close example. They also have private insurance options.

The Canadian Model – With this “National Health Insurance model”, the providers are private but the payer is a government-run insurance plan everyone pays into. Our Medicare system is a close example of this model. The private insurance plans are non-profit and manage their costs by limiting or delaying care.  Canada’s decentralized health system (coincidentally called “Medicare”) is technically a multi-payer system with slight differences for each of their ten provinces and three territories; some provinces/territories have co-pays at the point of care and others don’t.

The German Model – In this multi-payer system, providers and payers are private and largely funded through employer-based payroll deductions. Patients have co-pays at the point of care. The world’s first national health system (established around 1883) offers citizens 135+ private insurance plans called “sickness funds”. These private insurers negotiate prices with private hospitals and providers. Patient wait times are shorter than U.S. patients typically experience. This is the system most familiar to most Americans and might be …

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July 7th, 2017

Is Health Care A Right or a Privilege? (more brilliant comments from the amazing Michael Lujan)

Inspired by the great Michael Lujan and his post on LinkedIn.

At the center of the debate is this simple but loaded question. Every other developed nation has answered the question and enacted some form of universal health coverage (UHC). Proponents of the bill often make comparisons to the Canadian or the UK health systems. These comparisons are inaccurate, deliberately misleading, or possibly uninformed. The term “single-payer” refers to the financial arrangement; meaning one entity (the government) collects the funds (usually in the form of taxes) and this “single payer” also pays the providers. In a single-payer model, the providers can be private or government-owned. The government replaces the insurance company role and instead of paying premiums, Californians would pay for health care through higher taxes.

“When you look at all the different health care systems around the world… They are not all single-payer… and most are less socialized than America’s.” – T.R. Reid

Visit us next week when The Insurance Mom shares a comparison of four health care models around the world.…

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